WAEC bans private school teachers from surpervising




Teachers from private schools have been banned by the West African Examination Council (WAEC) from supervising its examinations, Premium Times reports. However, the ban has angered Christian faith-based schools who say they are being targeted. It was gathered that Ekaete Ettang, the president, Association of Christian schools in Nigeria on Thursday, March 22, in Jos, during a press conference of a meeting attended by 82 proprietors affected by the decision said the decision of the national examination body must be reversed.








She said: “In view of the above, the association of Christian schools demand that WAEC cancels the order and revert to status quo where credible teachers from Christian schools in Nigeria were involved in the supervision of WAEC examination. Failure to do so, all Christian schools nationwide will withdraw from future WAEC examinations.

“If WAEC dose not reverse this decision and planned implementation, all Christian schools will boycott future WAEC examination. WAEC and ministries of education must provide statistics to show the trend in the examination malpractices across the schools, which forms the basis of their decision. “The Christian schools demand that the laws and legislations that prohibit teachers from Christian schools from supervising WAEC examinations be made available, as they have been participating in this process over the years based on written communication that are on record.”

She said her members have been of proven character while supervising past examinations, and have been up and doing in ensuring that all forms of examination malpractices are curtailed. Demianus Ojijeogu, the head of public affairs of WAEC Nigeria, said that the examination body banned all private school teachers from supervising WAEC examinations in Nigeria, irrespective of their religion. According to him, private schools WAEC supervisors have been found indulging in examination malpractices. He said: “We have recently uncovered that the said supervisors from private schools do aid exams malpractice, because they have nothing to lose. They have no pension nor gratuity from their employers, so most of them mainly look for money during national examinations.” Ojijeogu directed aggrieved persons to contact the Ministry of Education for the reason for the ban.





NAIJ.com previously reported r that following complaints by some Muslim stakeholders in the country, the West African Examinations Council (WAEC) made some minor adjustments in its timetable for the 2018 May/June Senior Secondary School Certificate Examination (WASSCE). WAEC’s director of public affairs, Demianus Ojijeogu, told the Tribune on Saturday, March 17, that the board had to adjust the timetable to accommodate the interests of Muslims. He said: “The Council, being a responsible and responsive organisation, has made a slight adjustment on the timetable."










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